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236 Kane Street / Brooklyn, NY 11231 / 718 875-1550

Upcoming Services

July 21 - 22 Shabbat Matot-Masei

Candle lighting, 8:00 PM
Evening Service 6:30 PM

Shabbat Morning Service 9:15 AM
Shabbat ends 9:03 PM

Sunday Minyan 9:00 AM

Read this week’s Kane Street Connections.

Welcome

At Kane Street, we bring the wisdom and compassion of Jewish traditions to all, regardless of one’s background. Within our community are very traditional Jews and secularists, families and singles, straight and gay. Our members include many Jews-by-choice (converts) as well as interfaith families and Jews who are returning to their roots. We are rightly regarded as a community where any sincere person can find a place.

We'd love to meet you. If you have questions, feel free to contact Rabbi Sam Weintraub, Engagement Director Rabbi Jason Gitlin, Executive Director Alan Bell, or Rabbi Valerie Lieber, our Director of Education and Family Programming.

What are services like?

For questions about Kane Street Kids, our community's creative, progressive and hands-on preschool, contact Peggy Geller, Director of Kane Street Kids.

Learn about our creative and stimulating Hebrew School or see it in action! Enrollment is available online for the 2016-17 school year. Or for more information contact Rabbi Valerie Lieber at 718.875.1550, ext 2005.

Support KSS

"Charity is as potent a force for reconciliation as the ancient Temple altar."
Rabbi Jochanan Ben Zakkai
Donate Online
You can donate online using our donation page and pay securely through PayPal.

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For more information about ways to donate to Kane Street, please click here

News and Upcoming Events

Kane Street Joins Jewish Support for the Paris Climate Accord

Kane Street has joined a call for Jewish communities to respond to the climate crisis and take action. Through a Hazon organized advocacy campaign, our congregation will join with other Jewish community partners to identify ways we can respond to the climate crisis.

Read the full Jewish Letter in Support of the Paris Accord we have signed onto and add your name to join a growing group of Jews taking action on climate.

Hebrew Reading Course This Summer

Hebrew reading for adult beginners, co-sponsored by Kane Street
Sundays, 1:15-2:15 pm, July 9, 16, 23, 30; Aug 6, 13, 20, 27
Congregation Mount Sinai
Instructor: Rabbi Sue Oren
For adults interested in learning to read Hebrew (or refreshing their rusty skills). Learn to read the Hebrew “alefbet” (aka alphabet) on Sundays this summer! This course provides a systematic approach to recognizing and sounding out the Hebrew writing system. In class and at home, you’ll reinforce this learning through practical exercises and introduction to basic vocabulary from Jewish prayer.

For registration and questions, email Rabbi Oren or call her at 917.539.1334. Fee: $200 (includes course materials). Co-sponsors: Brooklyn Heights Synagogue, Congregation Mount Sinai & Kane Street Synagogue.

 

Youth & Family Shabbat Services On Summer Break

All youth and family services are now on a summer break. Mini Minyan, for children up to age five and their family members, will return on Saturday morning, August 5. Kinder and Minyan Noar will resume after Labor Day. As always, we welcome our younger congregants and their parents to the Sanctuary for Shabbat services.

Exterior Restoration of the Sanctuary Building is Underway

If you have visited Kane Street recently, you have likely noticed that the exterior of the sanctuary building looks quite different. Scaffolding now encircles both the east and west towers and covers the north (Kane Street) façade, reaching up past the roofline. This exciting milestone represents the commencement of restoration work on the building exterior. It marks the final phase of a process that Kane Street launched several years ago, when we started to take steps to ensure the physical integrity and historic character of the sanctuary exterior.
Details of these new developments are outlined in our January 2017 Update. We encourage members to continue to provide feedback by writing to design@kanestreet.org.

More News and Upcoming Events »

Li’fi Dati: As I See It

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Rabbi Sam Weintraub

The “Drei Vochen” The Three Weeks – Shiva Asar B’Tammuz (17 Tammuz) to Tisha B’av (9 Av) 5777, July 11 to August 1, 2017

The three weeks between Shiva Assar B’Tammuz and Tisha B’av mark a period of sadness and mourning – framed by two fast days – in which we remember some of the greatest tragedies of our history, including the destruction of the First and Second Temples, and the exiles which followed. During this period, festivities and indulgences are avoided or limited. For example, traditionally, we do not schedule weddings and other joyous occasions during the Three Weeks. In fulfillment of the Rabbinic dictum “When Av begins our joy is diminished” (Mishna Ta’anit 4:6), from 1 (Rosh Chodesh) Av to 9 Av, (sundown July 23 to August 1) we take on other restrictions. For example, many avoid eating meat and drinking wine during this period, except on Shabbat.

On the 17th of Tammuz (July 11 this year), in the civil year 70 C.E. Roman legions breached the walls of Jerusalem. This led quickly to the total downfall of Jerusalem three weeks later on Tisha B’Av, when the Temple was destroyed and the Second Expulsion began. The fast begins before daybreak and continues until nightfall.

Tisha B’av, the Ninth of Av, this year sundown July 31 to nightfall August 1, is the saddest day of the Jewish year. The First Temple was destroyed on this day by the Babylonians in 586 B.C.E. and the Second Temple was destroyed by the Romans in the year 70 C.E. Apart from Yom Kippur, Tisha B’av is the only full Jewish fast day, which means that we fast from sundown to nightfall. The fast begins Monday night, July 31, at sundown and lasts until nightfall on Tuesday, August 1.

Click here to read the full text.

Rabbi Weintraub’s Reflections on Social Issues

Spirituality and Politics, Social Change, and my Trip to Israel

Michael Brown and Eric Garner – A Jewish Perspective

Violence

Torah text, the Tribe of Dan, Ferguson and Baltimore

ISIS, Refugees, and our Father Jacob

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Website photography: Paul Bernstein | Hank Gans | Rich Pomerantz | Harvey Wang