Life Cycle

Membership in the Kane Street Synagogue congregation comes with an extended family with which to share life cycle events. Our community offers love and support in times of sorrow and joy. Please contact Rabbi Weintraub for guidance on matters of ritual practice. While there is no fee for his services at these events, it is customary to make a donation to the Synagogue or to the Rabbi’s Discretionary Fund. Speak with our Executive Director Marla Cohen about details such as rentals, caterers, catering policy, Kashruth policy, etc.

Brit Milah and Simcha Bat
Families often hold these simchas in the Sanctuary or Chapel, followed by a reception in the Community Room. Brit Milah, circumcision of baby boys, is held on the eighth day following the birth. Simchat Bat, the naming of baby girls, is held during a Shabbat morning Torah service in the weeks following the birth. It is customary for families to sponsor Kiddush.

Bar and Bat Mitzvah
Bar and Bat Mitzvah at the Synagogue are on Shabbat mornings and greatly enjoyed by Kane Street “regulars” as well as guests of the B’nai Mitzvah. The congregation has celebrated this joyous occassion since our beginnings. Our records include the names of B’nai Mitzvah from the 1860s – 2008.
Download the list

Bar and Bat Torah
The synagogue also sponsors special Shabbat morning ceremonies for adults who either did not have Bar or Bat Mitzvahs as children, or who wish to re-commit themselves to Torah and a Jewish life as adults. Celebrants prepare Torah and Haftarah readings, and teach from the Bimah.

Weddings
Rabbi Weintraub will officiate at the marriage of a Jewish couple at Kane Street Synagogue or other sites. Bridal couples need not be members of the Congregation, but are encouraged to join the community.

B’rit Rei’ut
The Covenant of Loving Partners: Gay and Lesbian Commitment Ceremonies – Following the historic 2006 decision of the Committee on Jewish Law and Standards of the Conservative Rabbis Law Committee, Rabbi Weintraub officiates at Commitment Ceremonies of Jewish gays and lesbians. The ceremony includes blessings and symbols taken from the traditional wedding ceremony, which have meanings and rituals that celebrate the inclusion of homosexuals in our modern Jewish community.

Funerals / Shiva
Rabbi Weintraub and our Chesed Network support members through the loss of a loved one. Rabbi Weintraub meets with the bereaved family after the death to plan the funeral, Shiva and other mourning customs. Our Chesed Committee provides leaders and members for Shiva minyanim at which we use the “Bond Life” prayer book.

Learn more about Our Cemeteries

Learn about When Death Occurs

Unveilings
The graveside unveiling ceremony is traditionally held before the first anniversary of a death. The brief ceremony does not require the presence of a rabbi. Rabbi Weintraub will advise families of prayers that may be read. When his schedule permits, he will officiate at an unveiling.

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